Masseuse’s tools

Good Morning Ted and Jody:

 

Juli was back on Sunday, so I got a great massage and caught up on her life.  She went to massage continuing education two weeks prior and was on duty at the nursing home the week before.  Indeed, she is on call all the time at the nursing home.  It is amazing what kind of trouble people our age and older can get into.  Ted, we have a lot of ‘how to get into trouble learning’ to do before we can get admitted to a nursing home.

 

Her continuing education involved learning to use blades (my term).  The first  photo shows the blade in the box. 20161016_090212.jpgThe second shows the heavy one out. 20161016_101731.jpg There are two sizes of blades. The smaller one (black in the box) is used in a gentle movement across the skin sensitizing the nerves near the surface.  The second is used in place of hot lava rocks in a scraping action which goes deep.  All in all not an unpleasant experience, but different.  The proof is in the aftermath—I felt better.

The week before, I went to a new masseuse.  This woman is certified to use tuning forks.  Tuning forks.jpg I have no idea what the rubber mallet is used for, perhaps striking the forks against to start them vibrating?  I did not have her use them on me, but she did a brief demonstration.  The fork is set to vibrating and placed in spots on the body.  The vibrations go deep in to the tissue without the pressure of a deep tissue massage.  Then the area is rubbed much like a Swedish massage.  Nancy signed up and had her use the tuning forks on her.  She used my words for describing it “It is different.” 

 

While we are on the topic of massage devices, my acupuncturist uses a Chinese soup spoon 20161007_090459as part of massaging patients prior to inserting the pins.  The forth attached photo shows the spoon.  The spoon is used to scrape with some pressure.  It is similar to Juli’s blades, but used with much shorter strokes and with more vigor.  I actually enjoy that part of my visit to the acupuncturist. 

 

The first week Juli was gone I visited Kimberly, the woman Juli uses and whom we both think is the best in the area.  She is, however, harder to get an appointment with then seeing the President.  Kimberly uses hot and cold lava rocks (I did not think to get a photo).  Most masseuses I have been to use lava rocks, but only hot ones.  The hot and cold contrast is both startling and effective.

 

I hadn’t thought to contrast massage tools until I got a comment from fragglerocking who use to be a sports masseuse mentioning change in the “industry.”  Apparently all she had to use when she was in practice were her hands, elbows and forearms. 

 

Warmest regards, Ed

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About democratizemoney

Retired University Professor
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2 Responses to Masseuse’s tools

  1. beetleypete says:

    I have never had a massage, but some of those implements look more like the equipment of a Dominatrix, rather than a therapist. I actually like the idea of the tuning forks. I recall that when I was at school I used to strike one, then hold it against my head to feel the vibration. It was more interesting than the music class, as I remember…
    Not sure about the rubber mallet. Perhaps when you find out what it is for, you can let me know. I have one in my toolbox, but have never found a good use for it as yet.
    Best wishes, Pete.

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  2. Things have certainly come a long way! Am pleased to see that tuning forks have a new use, as my latest career is as an audiologist. They were once used to distinguish between sensorineural or conductive hearing loss, completely obsolete nowadays but I do like them and am pleased they’ve found a whole new life. Strange to think I didn’t have them when they would have been useful, and now have them when they are not. I also do like the acupuncture spoon, especially the decorative smiley bean with a tree on it’s head, I can only imagine the significance of that.

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